MINING THE PERUVIAN ANDES

La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
right: Isau Güere Crispin; middle: Eric Ramos Chomorro; left: Jhonatan Garcia Huaman
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
Freddy Rojas Chacha, 41, President of the community of old town La Oroya.
Miners at the Colquijirca-Pasco mine (operated by Brocal, a partner of Buena Ventura), in Villa Pasco, Peru
La Oroya is a city of about 33,000 people on the River Mantaro in central Peru.[2] It is situated on the Altiplano some 176 km east-north-east of the national capital, Lima, and is the capital of the Yauli Province. La Oroya is the location of a smelting operation that earned the town a place on the Blacksmith Institute's 2007 report, "The World's Worst Polluted Places". 99% of children have blood levels that exceed acceptable limits, thanks to an American-owned (Doe Run) smelter that has been polluting the city (Lead, copper, zinc and sulfur dioxide) since 1922. The average lead level, according to a 1999 survey, was triple the WHO limit. Even after active emissions from the smelter are reduced, the expended lead will remain in La Oroya's soil for centuries — and there's currently no plan to clean it up. [from Time magazine, "The World's Most Polluted Places" 2007]
Cerro de Pasco (population 70,000) is a city in central Peru, located at the top of the Andean mountains. It is the capital of the Pasco region, and an important mining center (copper). At 4,330 metres (14,210 ft) elevation, it is one of the highest cities in the world.
Miners at the Colquijirca-Pasco mine (operated by Brocal, a partner of Buena Ventura), in Villa Pasco, Peru