WOMEN'S HEALTH IN NEPAL

Melamchi Health Clinic, Nepal
This 19-year-old new mother gave birth at home three days ago and has been bleeding since. Getting to the Melamchi Health Clinic included community members carrying her out of her village on a stretcher for half a day, then several hours on rough dirt roads. And she doesn't even live as remote as much of rural Nepal. The clinic was able to diagnose that she retained the placenta and arrange an ambulance to take her the remaining 3-4 hours to a hospital in Kathmandu for treatment. www.NYAGI.org is working to provide remote clinics in resource-limited areas with basic ultrasound skills and technology in order to make early diagnoses of high-risk births and avoid situations such as this.
This 19-year-old new mother gave birth at home three days ago and has been bleeding since. Getting to the Melamchi Health Clinic included community members carrying her out of her village on a stretcher for half a day, then several hours on rough dirt roads. And she doesn't even live as remote as much of rural Nepal. The clinic was able to diagnose that she retained the placenta and arrange an ambulance to take her the remaining 3-4 hours to a hospital in Kathmandu for treatment. www.NYAGI.org is working to provide remote clinics in resource-limited areas with basic ultrasound skills and technology in order to make early diagnoses of high-risk births and avoid situations such as this.
The busy local Health Clinic. Melamchi, Nepal.
The waiting ward at the Melamchi Health Clinic, Nepal.
Post birth recovery at the Melamchi Health Clinic, Nepal.
The busy local Health Clinic. Melamchi, Nepal.
Rural women's lives are tough in Nepal. Most are responsible for many of the homestead duties, such as tending crops and livestock, in addition to raising their families. Thokarpa, Nepal.
Indira Khatri, 23, had her second child four days ago. She lives is Thokarpa, Nepal, an hour walk (there are no roads) up the steep terraced hillside to the nearest clinic, and 4-5 hours drive, first on a rock strewn and mud-slicked 'road' switchbacking down the valley, then the final stretch on mixed paved and dirt roads, to the nearest hospital. Her first child was born premature and luckily she was in Kathmandu at the time where her husband sometimes works as a truck driver. They stayed in intensive care for about a week but had to go home early when the big earthquake hit in 2015. She was worried about her second child and went regularly to the local clinic for check ups but in these resource-limited remote villages, even the best care is severely lacking even basic diagnostic and preventative tools like ultrasound. See www.NYAGI.org to learn about efforts to equip and train skilled birthing attendants across rural Nepal in basic, essential ultrasound.
Indira Khatri, 23, had her second child four days ago. She lives is Thokarpa, Nepal, an hour walk (there are no roads) up the steep terraced hillside to the nearest clinic, and 4-5 hours drive, first on a rock strewn and mud-slicked 'road' switchbacking down the valley, then the final stretch on mixed paved and dirt roads, to the nearest hospital. Her first child was born premature and luckily she was in Kathmandu at the time where her husband sometimes works as a truck driver. They stayed in intensive care for about a week but had to go home early when the big earthquake hit in 2015. She was worried about her second child and went regularly to the local clinic for check ups but in these resource-limited remote villages, even the best care is severely lacking even basic diagnostic and preventative tools like ultrasound. See www.NYAGI.org to learn about efforts to equip and train skilled birthing attendants across rural Nepal in basic, essential ultrasound.
Indira Khatri, 23, had her second child four days ago. She lives is Thokarpa, Nepal, an hour walk (there are no roads) up the steep terraced hillside to the nearest clinic, and 4-5 hours drive, first on a rock strewn and mud-slicked 'road' switchbacking down the valley, then the final stretch on mixed paved and dirt roads, to the nearest hospital. Her first child was born premature and luckily she was in Kathmandu at the time where her husband sometimes works as a truck driver. They stayed in intensive care for about a week but had to go home early when the big earthquake hit in 2015. She was worried about her second child and went regularly to the local clinic for check ups but in these resource-limited remote villages, even the best care is severely lacking even basic diagnostic and preventative tools like ultrasound. See www.NYAGI.org to learn about efforts to equip and train skilled birthing attendants across rural Nepal in basic, essential ultrasound.
Travel to health care services in rural Nepal often involves walking for hours or days to catch a local bus to travel for many more hours on rural roads.
The Skilled Birth Attendants who attend these training sessions return to their clinics with new ultrasound probes and tablets that both work as monitors and that house the interactive ultrasound learning app, obNAV. Dhulikhel Hospital, Dhulikhel Nepal.
NYAGI's training method involves hands-on practice with simple ultrasound tools under the guidance of experienced doctors and sonographers. By focusing on the most basic diagnoses necessary for identifying at-risk births, the Skilled Birth Attendants who attend these training sessions can return to their clinics after just a week of training and begin using ultrasound to save lives. Dhulikhel Hospital, Dhulikhel Nepal.